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HOYMA

One evening. Twenty concerts. Ten artists. Ten homes.

The village of Gøta provides the scene for an innovative method of experiencing music, where people walk from door to door, popping in to listen to live music performed by musicians in the living rooms of locals. All the music is unplugged and performed without any sound or lighting system. Back to basics, you could say.

The idea of HOYMA is sprung from the fact that it is often small and intimate concert experiences that are the most powerful.

At its core, HOYMA is a way of searching back to the old Faroese tradition of going from house to house and gathering around the fireplace in the living room. This is how people living on these isolated and stormy islands in small villages have socialised for centuries. The living room was central to the preservation and creation of the Faroese language, storytelling and singing tradition at a time when the Faroese language and culture was not officially appreciated by the authorities.

In this day and age of Facebook and Netflix, this old tradition has somewhat died. HOYMA is an attempt to rejuvenate this tradition, which has played a central role in the building of Faroese identity and society.

  • Fun fact: HOYMA comes from the Faroese word for home, which is “heima”, but is phonetically spelled “hoyma”, as pronounced by the locals of Gøta. For more about HOYMA, read this article by The Guardian.